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2017 Frontier Festival

The Wild Frontier

     

When George Washington took the oath of office in New York City, the capital of the fledgeling Republic in 1789, Western Pennsylvania and Northern Virginia were the edges of civilization, the jumping off point for the wildnerness of the west, like Ohio, which was part of the Dakota Territory until 1803.  Life hereabouts wasn't easy. Outside of the cities, the land, as far as the eye could see, was covered with old growth forest so, if you wanted to build a house and start farming, you had to cut down a lot of trees with whatever hand tools you brought with you. The native peoples already living here objected strenuously to the newcomers booting them off their land and fought back hard.  Roads were narrow muddy trails that were usually impassible after a heavy rain and the spring thaw. Before the late 1800s, Dunkard Creek, that's the stream skirting the Park border, was mostly navigable, and that was how goods moved from the Monongahela River to and from the interior.

 

The Frontier Festival

The Festival has been a Mason-Dixon Historical Park tradition for thirty-four years, during which we celebrate our community's rich history and culture. We have a full slate of exhibitions and demonstrations that will both entertain and educate you. Included is our pre-1840 frontier encampment  to give you a small taste of life when Greene County was first settled.

Yhere's Don Pyle's display of antique and classic cars , the ever-popular steam engines and antique tractor parade; contact  Harold Campbell  724-878-5682 or Dave Chisler 304-879-5881 if you'd like to display your treaured antique vehicle or for more information. Learn how our frontier ancestors caught lunch with a Saturday-only display of trapping techniques by ABC Humane Animal Removal. Enjoy a selection of diverse musical entertainments on the cabin stage; Rich Lash, 304-798-3596 for more information.  Tom Hritz will make the sawdust fly as he produces chainsaw carvings while you watch.

You can purchase a large variety of locally produced artworks and craft items from our many booths. Have breakfast each day with Diane. Sample maple syrup products, jams and jellies, Ted's fudge, Bud's sweet sausage sandwiches, canned peppers, funnel cakes,Uncle Jim's donuts, beans and cornbread with homemade butter, fresh squeezed lemonade, cabbage and noodles (haluski), macaroni and potato salad, sassafras tea, fresh cut fries, kettle corn and more!

Statler's Baked Goods is on hand with salt raised bread (an Appalachian tradition), as well as pies and cookies. Try emu cream for your aches and pains. Stewart's Farm & Greenhouse has an assortment of pot plants: lavender, variety herbs, garlic, and ornamental flowers.

Try your luck in our 50/50 drawing. For your comfort and convenience, we offer and air-conditioned rest area inside the cabin and a golf cart shuttle to transport the hiking impaired from the parking area to the festival grounds.

 

     

Come Hungry

We have an ample and varied selection of delectible edibles for your enjoyment.  Have breakfast with us and enjoy a plate of biscuits and gravy. Spend the day munching on, cornbread with soup beans, our famous Mason-Dixon Dogs,  fries with that, onion rings, potato and macaroni salads, cabbage and noodles (that's haluski to the locals), funnel cakes, Uncle Jim's fresh-made donuts, cookies, salt risen bread. You can even buy a whole pie or two.  And, if your're an active duty servicemember, or a U. S. military veteran, you can still visit the Park booth and get a free Mason Dixon Dog and cup of coffee. All you can eat. A whole meal on a bun. It's the least we can do.

   

Mark Your Calendar!

The Frontier Heritage Festival will be held Saturday, August 26th and Sunday August 27th from 10AM until 5PM daily. There's even a beautiful non-denomenational church service heald in the great out of doors Sunday morning at 9AM. School starts soon, so give yourselves and your kids one last blast of summer fun. As always, admission is free.